The Success Matrix

The-Success-Matrix

Vision, Process, Output

Gerry Langeler introduces and clearly defines eight workplace archetypes, each of whom represents a crucial stretch of any company’s road to success. An engaging blend of fiction and non-fiction sets The Success Matrix apart, making it fluid and accessible as both a blueprint for business triumphs and as a good, captivating read. The Brute’s output is unmatched, the Bureaucrat masters the process, the Dreamer’s vision sets the whole thing in motion, and the true Successes (namely, the readers of this book) know how to get the most from each of them. Experience and insight combine with an affable style to make The Success Matrix an invaluable tool for any business leader.

 

Take a Look Inside

Download a PDF sample

Buy Your Copy


More Reviews

What Others Are Saying

“The Success Matrix is an insightful, practical approach to assessing people and organizations, firmly rooted in the author’s more than thirty years of experience as an entrepreneur, corporate leader and venture capital funds manager.”

Allan Moss, former CEO of Macquarie Group, Australia

“If you’ve spent any time at all in the business world, you’ll recognize all of the characters Gerry Langeler clearly describes in The Success Matrix. And if you haven’t spent any time in the business world, then it’s all the more important for you to read this book. It’s an effective, insightful portrait of the personalities one encounters on a daily basis, and also a spot-on how-to manual for anyone who endeavors to find success.”

“I really liked this book. Gerry Langeler understands from his considerable hands-on experience that blending and empowering a diverse assortment of personalities and skills is the key to any successful enterprise.

He provides an easy-to-use approach to identifying key types of people and then employing their particular talents to achieve success in any endeavor.”

Steve Wynne, former CEO, Adidas America

Take the Money and Run!

TakeTheMoney-Run

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO VENTURE CAPITAL

This book is for entrepreneurs who want to realize their vision, want to build a major enterprise, want to change the world. To win, you need two things: cash and speed. You need to get the money and then run like crazy. To get the money, you may want to raise it from venture capital (VC) firms. But the reality is far fewer than 1 in 100 companies approaching VCs ever get to “take the money.” So, the first section of this book provides a behind-the-scenes look at how VC firms work, and more importantly how they think. You’ll get first-hand insight into what you can do to improve your chances and what to avoid that can doom your hopes. The second section of the book will help you “run.” It covers almost every segment of start-up operations, from product development to financing to staffing to sales and marketing. Gerry Langeler’s 30 years as a successful venture capitalist and entrepreneur who raised money from top VC firms, provides the secrets to help you achieve your dreams.

Take a Look Inside

Download a PDF sample

Buy Your Copy


More Reviews

What Others Are Saying

“I wish I had this when I started out.  It’s an absolute ‘must read’ for first-time entrepreneurs.  Take the Money and Run! puts you on the VC’s side of the table and helps you understand how they evaluate your business plan.  It would have saved me (and a few VC’s) from some very unproductive meetings!”

Mike DiFranza, Founder & President, Captivate Network

“Well-written and humorous.  Should be required reading for all entrepreneurs, especially the section on how to clearly articulate what your product is and who’s going to buy it.”

Other Writings

HBR

The Vision Trap

At Mentor Graphics Corporation, Gerry Langeler was the executive responsible for vision and he discovered that vision has the power to weaken a strong company. As Mentor grew more and more successful, Langeler formulated vision statements that were more and more ambitious, grand, and inspirational. The company traded its gritty determination to survive for a dream of future glory. The once explicit call for effective action became a fervid cry for abstract perfection. Over the years, various transitional visions were created but grew to a point in which the company had stopped making product and was making poetry. Finally, in 1991, after six years of increasing self-infatuation, Mentor hit a wall of decreasing indicators. Langeler, who had long since begun to doubt the value of abstract visions, reinstated Build Something People Will Buy. And Mentor was back to basics, a sense of purpose back to its workplace.